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Next Commune
August 27
Octagrape, The Cardielles, DJ Adam Salter, Limited Edition Poster By Jaclyn Rose & Photos by Nicole Espina.
9PM / FREE / Whistle Stop
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About

Commune is a movement of artists, designers, musicians, and people that take a stand against tobacco corporations and their presence in the scene.


We have rejected big corporations for a long time, like Big Music that hinders creative freedom and Big Fashion that runs sweatshops. Our stand against Big Tobacco is even more important, since the industry contributes to things like world hunger, deforestation, and neo conservative policies.

Even worse, the tobacco industry’s pervasive marketing in the art and music scene has manufactured an image that people like us smoke. So now young people that look up to us believe that smoking is more important than creativity, music and self-expression to fit in. We’re out to change this distorted image of the scene.

Commune supports the local and thriving talent in San Diego, San Francisco and Burlington and every month teams up with a local band, DJ, designer and artist at Commune Wednesdays. By celebrating local and educating people about the things Big Tobacco does or contributes to that they may not otherwise support, we hope to shift the creative scene image from one that smokes to one that focuses more on creativity, music and art.


Thanks to all of the bands, DJs, artists, designers, and boutiques that have made Commune Wednesdays a success. If you would like to be part of Commune Wednesdays and take a stand against Big Tobacco, contact Jenny at info@jointhecommune.com

See Who Has Worked with Commune

Krissy Fernandez

Gone Baby Gone

SAUL Q

IDYLL WILD

The Hollerin

Haven Pizzeria

Honeycomb Factory

MIKE DELGADO (Moving Units)

ZIGGY SHUFFLEDUST

Pablo Stanley

Jeans Wilder

Amerikan Bear

THE MILKCRATES (DJ Mike & Angie)

Oscar Moreno

Side Saddle Vintage

AndrePower

COLOUR VISION

BEEHIVE

BANGDOE

Katra Awad

Bradford Lynn

Fever The Ghost

Barbarian

NICELY

Sir Gilles McHennison

Brandon Kinkel

Fever the Ghost

Katra Awad

Bradford Lynn

Future You

Baby Clydesdale Organic Sriracha

Mothlight

Heavy Hawaii

Colin Ingram

Dead Feather Moon

DJ Keith Sweaty

Buddy Banter

Hunt and Gather

Celeste Byers

DJ Clinebell Express

New Mexico

Roxy Jones

Yarns and Noble

Bruin

Cuckoo Chaos

Found Pieces

DJ Blairly Legal

Bodacious Tendencies

Cliff Endsley

DJ Mike and Ryan

Nova Albion

Industry Bastards

Javi Nunez

Luis Alvarez

Punctilio Project

Kill Quanti

Drew Andrews and The Spectral Cities

Mikeydead

Keith Stone

DJ Luis the Beast

Brendan B and The Breaks

Lucy Duarte

Oliver Rae and The Love Stitch

The New Kinetics

Moodbender

Josh Edgerton

Found

Corey Biggs

Snakesuit

Marcus Price

Mookie Wookie

DJ P-Star

Black Hondo

Ditches

Nate Bergeron

Hammered

Throwback

T-Murder

Short Eyes

Andre Power

Edison Manufacturing Co.

Jesse Lamonaca and The Dime Novels

Petite Amore

The Handsome DJs

DJ Keithxsn

So Many Wizards

Hotel St. George

My Darling Nikki Love

Danielle Nagel

Farrell Lynn

Room E

Bruin

Cami Robinson

Feral Pony Vintage

Art Vandelay

Dr. Seahorse

Bujwah

Tropical Popsicle

Jr. Hernandez

Ghostline

Nik Ewing

The Deadview Project

DJ Cory Casey

Mrs. Magician

Jen Fong

Magpie Cacti

Trap Gold

The Stereotypes

Isaac Gibbs

Neopolitan Ecowear

DJ Snakehips

The Slpwlkrs

Nick McPherson

Natural Pond Vintage

DJ Peso

Adam Salter

Ikah Love

Andrea Welton

Cool, Hip and Cheap

VJ Bang

Grand Tarantula

The Death Eaters

Bowtied

Kevin Bonner

Andrew Decade

Beat Panther

Eric Wixon

Head-Crazed

Tomas Bohan & Ace

The Kabbs

Charlene Espinoza

Jeweliany

Colour Vision

Arrowws

Dvice

Throwback

DJ Francey Pants

Sunday Times

Jason Feather

Lisa Jee

DJ Pleasure Victim

GAUX NU VAUX

Robin Eisenberg

Ana Dolores Dueñas

Timothy Hines

Long Live Logos

Dion Terry

Unstandard Deviations

Mikey Face

The Dabbers

Cash Crop Clothing

Yonder Biology

Groundfloor

Cats of Japan

Tocayo

Erick Diaz

Exist 1981

Peso

The Deatheaters

Lizeth Santos

The Deadview Project

Adam Salter

The Bloodflowers

Adam Jafry

Love Street Vintage

Tented Arch

VJ Bang

The Old in Out

Cara Heslip

JewelRIA

Brian Carver

Mario Orduno

Anasazis

Kevin Bonner

Libby Fannies

Andrew Decade

Lights On

The Style Shark

WAFFO

Matt the Hoople

The Burning of Rome

MESH

Monty Montgomery

Corey Biggs

Sex Mannequin

Harry the Hat

Fables by Barrie

Red October

C. Wizard

Bunky

Hammered

Anhq

Blends

Brett Holman

Gabe Vega

Crash Encore

Jeff Lavinsky

Natalia Benson Jewelry

Desert Diamonds

John Kelley

Mauve Riley

The Modlins

Andria Renee

Milo

Eliot Greenwald

DJ Nathan Black

Sarah Sculley

Parker Siglin

Vitro

Black Heart Bunny

Adam Jafry

DJ Blairly Legal

Hotel St. George

Ryan Dean

Mimi & Red

DJ Trevor Young

Buddy Akai

POP!

Tim Hardy

Brian Clinebell

Clean Cuts

Apes of Wrath

Kenny King

Copper Junction Jewelry

DJ Ryan

The Howls

Dekline

Sassy Boys

DJ Dubchops

The Swedish Models

Pony Attack!!

The Muslims (The Soft Pack)

U-31

Soda Bar

The Kensington Club

Whistlestop

Michael Turi

DJ Mikey Face

Bar Pink

Chantel Paul

Scott Caligure

Atoms

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The Facts

We’re not going to lecture anyone about black lungs, smoker’s coughs, or diseases that you can’t pronounce and we can’t spell. Everyone has already heard all that.

We’re not going to berate smokers, and we are not at all against smokers. We’re the Commune, we love you no matter what. We just want to present the facts, cause the tobacco industry harms more than just the person who lights up at a bar. Big tobacco’s practices harm the environment, contribute to corruption and, worst of all, target our scene. You may not realize it, but big tobacco spends a healthy chunk of change attempting to create a scene where people have to smoke to fit in. No joke.

Our goal is simple; we believe the money we spend on tobacco supports horrible things that we otherwise would never support. And that the industry’s presence in our scene makes young people think they need to start smoking to fit in. For these reasons, we believe the scene would be better smokefree and ask you to help us. Join the Commune and support a smokefree scene.

  • On January 27, 2003 Philip Morris (PM) officially completed the change of its corporate name to “Altria Group.”

  • Reynolds American is the parent company of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. It is also the parent company of Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company, the makers of Natural American Spirits.

  • Animal testing has been used by the tobacco industry to find ways to make their products more addictive (effective), not safer for humans. In one study, beagles were forced to breathe in toxic chemicals via tracheostomies and 28 of them died from lung cancer.

  • R.J. REYNOLDS (MAKER OF CAMELS) DOES RESEARCH WITH MICE AND RABBITS TO UNDERSTAND THE EFFECTS OF SMOKING. RESEARCH CONCLUDED SMOKING CAUSES CANCER AND EMPHYSEMA. INSTEAD OF FURTHER RESEARCH, THE COMPANY DESTROYED THE RESEARCH, FIRED THE SCIENTISTS, AND TORE DOWN THE BUILDING.

  • The tobacco industry uses its revenues to test tobacco products on dogs, rabbits, mice and monkeys. In one study in 2008, monkeys were killed to examine the effect of nicotine on their brains. When smoking stops, the animal testing stops too.

  • The tobacco industry has conducted experiments on animals for decades. In some experiments, beagles we strapped down and fitted with facemasks, which forced them to inhale smoke from lit cigarettes. This research led to discoveries on how to make cigarettes more addictive to humans

  • 4.5 Trillion cigarette butts are thrown on the ground or in bodies of water each year. There are 7 billion people in the world. That means that every person in the world would need to pick up 642 cigarette butts a year in order to rid the earth of cigarette litter.

  • Big Tobacco labels their cigarettes with things like light, ultra-light and low-tar even though they can be as deadly and addictive as regular cigarettes.

  • As long ago as 1969, a tobacco company executive agreed to “avoid advertising directed to young people.” Yet 10 years later, they supplied their products to be featured in The Muppet Movie and in 1994 said “Cherry Skoal is for somebody who likes the taste of candy, if you know what I’m saying.”

  • Smoking causes $96.7 billion worth of health care expenditures each year in the U.S. A big chunk of that is paid with the taxes that you pay.

  • Cigarette smoke contains about 7,000 different chemicals with at least 60 cancer-causing substance. It also includes chemicals that are found in human sweat, pee, rocket fuel, mothballs, pesticides, formaldehyde, and household cleaners.

  • Up to 5.7lbs of wood is used to make one pack of cigarettes. Through this process, the tobacco industry causes 494,000 acres of deforestation EVERY YEAR. This doesn’t even include the paper or packaging.

  • When asked why none of the company’s executives smoked, an RJ Reynolds representative responded. “We don’t smoke this shit. We only sell it. We reserve the right to smoke for the young, the poor, the black, and the stupid.”

  • A tobacco company once gave $125,000 worth of food to a charity, according to an estimate by The Wall Street Journal. Then, they spent well over $21 million telling people about it

  • More than 60% of tobacco-growing land is located in low-income countries where tobacco is cultivated as a cash crop for export.10-20 million people could be fed if all tobacco crops were replaced with food crops.

  • In 1994, the CEOs from 7 major tobacco companies testified before Congress, under oath, that they believe nicotine is NOT addictive.

  • In 1996, Charles Harper, R. J. Reynolds Chairman said, “If children don’t like to be in a smoky room, they’ll leave.” When asked by a shareholder about infants, who can’t leave a smoky room, Harper stated, “At some point they begin to crawl.”

  • In 1997, a Big Tobacco executive once said, under oath, that he believed Gummy Bears were addictive like cigarettes.

  • When asked why none of the company’s executives smoked, an RJ Reynolds representative responded. “We don’t smoke this shit. We only sell it. We reserve the right to smoke for the young, the poor, the black, and the stupid.”

  • A tobacco company once gave $125,000 worth of food to a charity, according to an estimate by The Wall Street Journal. Then, they spent well over $21 million telling people about it.

  • In 1985, one tobacco vice president wondered, in reference to smoking-related deaths, if we should ban sleep since according to him the majority of people die in their sleep.

  • In 1997, a Big Tobacco executive said, under oath, that he believed Gummy Bears were addictive like cigarettes.

  • Tobacco companies’ products kill 36,000 people every month. That’s more lives than there are public garbage cans in NYC.

  • Big Tobacco labels their cigarettes with things like light, ultra-light and low-tar even though they can be as deadly and addictive as regular cigarettes.

  • As long ago as 1969, a tobacco company executive agreed to “avoid advertising directed to young people.” Yet 10 years later, they supplied their products to be featured in The Muppet Movie and in 1994 said “Cherry Skoal is for somebody who likes the taste of candy, if you know what I’m saying.”

  • According to the New York Times, in 1998, one tobacco executive said, “Nobody knows what you’d turn to if you didn’t smoke. Maybe you’d beat your wife.”

  • As late as 1999, tobacco companies placed in-store advertising signage at a child’s eye level.

  • In 1978, one tobacco executive said that “unhappiness causes cancer.”

  • A tobacco executive said that smoking is only as addictive as “sugar and salt and Internet access.”

  • Since 1987, Big Tobacco has increased their spending on advertising and promotions every year, reaching $250.8 million in 2005.

  • Smoking causes $96.7 billion worth of health care expenditures each year in the U.S. A big chunk of that is paid with that taxes that you pay.

  • Big tobacco tests its products on animals. Industry documents show they drug animals such as cats, guinea pigs, dogs and apes with crack as part of the experiments.

  • Altria (Parent Company of Phillip Morris) is the third largest political contributor in the U.S. Over $35 million was spent on political campaigns and candidates over the last decade. Big Tobacco gives millions dollars a year to neo-conservative political candidates.

  • The Tobacco Industry produces more than 2 billion kilograms of manufacturing waste annually.

See All

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Limited Edition Artist Posters

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Quit Groups

quit-group-header

It’s no secret that Commune is against Big Tobacco, and although we aren’t anti-smoker we’re certainly not opposed to the idea of helping people quit smoking if they want to.

Quitting smoking means less money in Big Tobacco’s corrupt pockets and it’s one of the healthiest things you can do. But we also understand that quitting is not easy, typically it’s not that fun either, so Commune decided to create a fun, safe and unconventional way for people, who are interested, to quit.

15 Locals meet up for 10 weeks in hopes to decrease their smoking rates and eventually quit.  Smoking rates are measured using a smokerlyzer, a device that measures the carbon monoxide levels in their lungs. Each week when a participant decreases their smoking rate they will receive a cash incentive.  At certain intervals, smoking is also measured using a saliva test strip. A local smoking counselor is also available at some weekly meetings to answer any questions the participants have.

Current Group Join a future group

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Featured Local

FEATURED LOCAL: Pablo Stanley

 

San Diego’s own Pablo Stanley is an illustrator, graphic designer and comic book writer. He also sports one hell of a sexy beard. Pablo works in downtown SD and makes his office workspace out of what used to be a brothel, way back when.

Pablo was one of three finalists in our Art Against Animal Cruelty contest and we’re pleased to announce he took home the $1,500 grand prize.

Although a gifted artist, Pablo doesn’t like to force his inspiration. If it takes days, even weeks to come up with an idea, he’s fine with it. It’s about keeping his work true to a valid inspiration.

“I chose to do a poster for this contest because it hit home on 2 levels: ethical treatment of animals and smoking. I’m a non-smoker and a vegetarian,” said Stanley. “I think that what Commune is doing is pretty cool. I mean an artist can make a very complicated issue communicated in a very simple way. It’s great for Commune to bring artists into the issue.”

Be sure to check out Pablo’s winning artwork featured in the artist poster section of the website and more of his artwork at stanleycolors.com.

 

FEATURED LOCAL: Briana Mooney

 

My name is Briana. I am a 26 years old photographer and artist’s reference model for artists and academies. I enjoy surrounding myself with all things creative and collective in life. I am a vegetarian and a recent cancer activist, but used to be a smoker of ten years.

I started smoking at age fifteen; in my youth, I thought it was “rock ‘n’ roll”. Over the years, I went from being a daily smoker to a social smoker. I made attempts to quit, but I could never truly do it. Last year, my doctor found abnormal cell development in my blood and I became at high risk of cancer, so I made drastic changes in my life. I went “cold-turkey” and quit for good.

Not only am I against greedy, evil tobacco companies but I am also against major, food companies using preservatives, hormones and other chemicals to mass-produce food for profit. I am not one for buying cancer, be it by vice or necessity.

I love and support Commune for what they dare to do for us, amidst varying social scenes in our communities. They support local artists, designers and musicians at local venues under an anti-tobacco banner. They have big aspirations, but they keep it local, because change often begins at “home”.

Commune has not only given me an opportunity to meet creative artists, designers and musicians, but they dare do it in places, like bars, that are typically haunted by heavy smokers. The unabated courage of Commune made it far easier for me to stay smokefree. The spirit of Commune and its community is a comforting one and its spirit gives me more faith in humanity.

For more on Briana check out Honeycomb Factory; where you can find vintage clothing/accessories, renewed items and revamped originals, handmade goods, antiques, knick-knacks, supplies and original artwork/photo prints, all produced by Briana herself.

 Etsy.com/shop/HoneycombFactory

FEATURED LOCAL: Brandon Kinkel

 

Congratulations to Brandon Kinkel for being Commune’s Featured Local of the month. I emailed Brandon to congratulate him and to see what he had going on.

1. When did you discover your love for photography and what are your favorite things to shoot?

I would say I married photography about 6 months ago. I’ve always shot photos off & on growing up, but now it’s all I do. I look around all the time & see stuff I want to take pictures of. I enjoy shooting people who are passionate about anything; music, art, partying, the outdoors, road trips, whatever comes my way that my eyes are into!

2. Where can people find your stuff? Any upcoming shows or cool things you are working on?

You can view all my photos at throwluck.com I’m currently in the process of making a professional website/portfolio that will be focused on weddings, portraits, the outdoors, fashion, and music. Right now I’m touring with Jeans Wilder and I consistently shoot photos of Wild Wild Wets in San Diego as well as outta town. Capturing memories of tour life as well as the venues and the shows. I also have an apprenticeship with a wedding photographer & have been really enjoying that side of shooting as well.

3. Favorite kind of camera to shoot with?

Canon Mark ii right now.

4. Do you prefer film or digital?

I prefer digital right now but I could see that changing. Right now I’m concentrating on digital photography, but am definitely interested & looking forward to shooting film & discovering/collecting all kinds of cameras.

5. Favorite instagram filter?

I probably use x-pro the most. #instagramforlife

6. What is your favorite part of Commune?

I like Commune because it brings creative people together and has a positive goal.

7. Why do you think it’s important to take a stand against Big Tobacco?

Big Tobacco just wants your cash. Everyone knows smoking is bad for you. Everyone knows smoking sucks when you first start. Next thing you know your addicted, you smell, you got black lungs, and your girlfriend left you because big tobacco killed your boner. Guarantee that’s a true story for someone out there.

Photo from Brandon’s “FEAR THE REAPER” photo series. Check out more photos from the series below.

Commune Featured Local Brandon Kinkel Fear The Reaper

FEAR THE REAPER #1 (All Our Times Have Come)

FEAR THE REAPER #2 (Baby Take My Hand)

FEAR THE REAPER #3 (Last Night Of Sadness)

FEAR THE REAPER #4 (Love of Two is One)

8. Anything else you want people to know?

If it wasn’t for all the rad, creative, fun friends I have I wouldn’t be a photographer. I’d have nothing to shoot. The world’s a beautiful place. Get out there & enjoy it! Do what you love! Make some memories. Aaaaaand Contact me if you’re interested in modeling or working with me in some way. I love taking photos. Aaand people should know that they should buy and support local & touring musicians. Finally if your picture is on my website THANK YOU!

Congrats again to Brandon Kinkel!

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com.

FEATURED LOCAL: New Mexico

 

Congratulations to New Mexico for being Commune’s Featured Local of the month. I emailed the guys to congratulate them and to see what they had going on. Check out what the oh so amazing, Robert Kent had to say.

1. How long have you guys been playing together and how did you come up with the name New Mexico?

New Mexico has been a band for almost 3 years. A drunken late night moment in Austin for SXSW, one of Jake’s buddies, Johnny Merrick, was commenting on Jake’s New Mexico shirt. We all thought it was funny, we all checked off on it, boom, that’s our name we’re sticking to it. So, it was more of a sudden thing that was put into existence out of randomness and it became something each of us could all look at in our own ways and discover different meanings from. It wasn’t derived from any one point other than Jake’s buddy, Johnny Merrick. We’re also immediately a part of a certain fraternity of bands with geographic names like America, Kansas, Beirut, New Mexico you know ‘em, they’ll come to you.

2. How would you describe your music?

We’re still trying to figure it out ourselves. What do you think we sound like, Jenny? (The answer is rad, duh) We sound like if John Carpenter (the director) was making a soundtrack using a band with members of Tubeway Army, the Cure, Crazy Horse and Nirvana.

3. What’s one interesting fact about each person in the band?

Dustin: Rides his bike through Florida Canyon at 4am to talk to the Owls.
Jake: Studies how to turn himself into a computer.
Rob: Meditates with binaural beats and drones over tea and afternoon sunlight.
Peter: Works on a plan to create a TV empire just to sell his homemade guitar pedals.

4. Do you guys have anything exciting coming up that people should keep their eye out for?

We’re putting out a full-length vinyl LP called, Malpaís, in the Spring.

5. What’s your favorite thing about Commune?

You, Jenny. What you’ve been able to do with this event, putting on quality entertainment, giving local artisans a place to showcase their products, featuring local art, and getting all these people together for the cause of our collective health? Can there be anything better? (Aww shucks guys, you’re going to make me blush. Commune is only successful though because of the amazing people who continue to agree to be a part of it. Thanks for making Commune awesome. You guys are the best!)

6. Why do you think it’s important to take a stand against Big Tobacco?

Its important to take whatever stand you can against ANY big industry. Lobbying power in DC is completely lopsided. It’s the consumer’s responsibility to decide where he spends his dime. Tobacco, oh, tobacco, how it helped in the early days of America, and now look at it, its a disgrace!

Down with big business. Support Local. Contribute and be part of a community. You guys are role models, keep up the great work!

Congrats again to New Mexico!

Don’t forget to “like” New Mexico on Facebook and/or listen to them on Bandcamp.

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com.

FEATURED LOCAL: Bruin

 

1. How long have you guys been playing together and how did you come up with the name BRUIN?

The two of us have been making music together since early 2011. At the time Nick lived in Northern California and I (Dom) lived in San Diego so everything was made through Gmail. He would make a beat and I would play some guitar/keyboard and sing. It wasn’t until 2012 that Nick moved to So-Cal that we were actually able to play shows together. Originally I wanted to call the band DEWDS, but just before we released our first EP some kid from SD named his band Dudes. So, we couldn’t do that anymore. After a very short brainstorming session, Nick and I settled on the name BRUIN (all caps) because we went to the same high school together and that was our mascot. P.S. all we did in high school was sk8board and steal beer from Round Table Pizza, my second job, no big deal.

2. How would you describe your music?

I’m pretty obsessed with Toro y Moi, Brothertiger and Neon Indian. I kind of feel like that’s the type of music that I’ve been waiting to hear since I was a child. Nick has been pretty hip-hop influenced since the day I met him, so it’s somewhere in between that. Nick never ceases to amaze me with his ability to turn some 1800′s Slovenian Polka song into the most murderous beat of all time.

3. What’s one interesting fact about each person in the band?

Well, Nick used to be in the top graffiti artists in Sacramento under the name Adept and I can fart the alphabet.

4. Do you guys have anything exciting coming up that people should keep their eye out for?

We are currently recording an album with Keith Sweaty that we plan to release in March. Also, we are supposed to play a show for the grand opening of this rad clothing shop BUJWAH. It’s going be a block party at 1011 23rd St on March 24th.

5. What is your favorite thing about Commune?

I personally was a smoker since I was 16 years old until I turned 25. We’re talking over a pack a day that entire time (I just hit my four year mark without having a single grit). Cigarettes start out as a social icebreaker and something that can calm your nerves. Very rapidly it becomes a crutch that envelopes through all of your daily activities and soon enough it becomes a part of who you are. At some point, it seems impossible to do the simplest tasks without a smoke. I feel that Commune goes about the quitting process in a helpful way. Instead of being judgmental to people who are already well aware of how harmful cigarettes are, Commune assists people who have already made the conscious decision to quit on their own. Also, I think it’s pretty dope that you guys help fuel the music scene, considering music is the only thing that I care about.

6. Why Do you take a stand against Big Tobacco?

Big tobacco is probably about as evil and money hungry as it gets. To make a product whose only outcome for its consumers is inevitably cancer, is the most horseshit fucked up way to go about running a business. Big tobacco isn’t a person, Joe camel isn’t a guy that you’re gonna meet in a bar, Big Tobacco is a machine that was built on the sole purpose of making cash. Fuck big tobacco in its stupid fucking ass.

7. Anything else you want people to know about BRUIN?

We are two dudes that are trying to make music the best we know how. If you want to hear it or download it for free go to bruin.bandcamp.com. Also, we usually play our sets pants-less, but in long t-shirts, so that’s pretty cool.

Congrats again to BRUIN!

Don’t forget to “like” BRUIN on Facebook and/or listen to them on Bandcamp.

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com.

FEATURED LOCAL: Nicole Espina

 

Congratulations to Nicole Espina for being Commune’s Featured Local of the month. I emailed my fav babe to congratulate her and to see what she had going on.

1. When did you discover your love for photography and what are your favorite things to shoot?

I discovered my love for photography in high school shooting for yearbook (film, in those days) and expanded to digital while globetrotting in college. I love to shoot everythinggggg – light, people, patterns, lines, mundane details. Nan Goldin said it best: “If it were possible, I’d want no mechanism between me and the moment of photographing. The camera is as much a part of my everyday life as talking or eating or sex.”

2. Where can people find your stuff? Any upcoming shows or cool things you are working on? 

My website nicoleespinaphotography.com is woefully unupdated, but people are more than welcome to check it out. No shows currently as freelancing and school take up most of my time (( plug for the City College Photo department! )). I am currently researching different framing methods to try in the darkroom and am always looking to set up shoots with other imaginative people.

3. Favorite kind of camera to shoot with?

Nikon FE for film and Canon 50D for digital. Holgas are fun too and, like a lot of people, the iPhone has become my everyday point and shoot.

4. Do you prefer film or digital?

Digital is cheaper, faster, and more eco-friendly. But film has the warmth and, for me, the patience involved in shooting, processing, and printing your own film makes for better photos.

5. Favorite instagram filter?

Depending on the photo I like Amaro, Earlybird, and Toaster although Statigram says X-pro II is my most used filter.

6. What is your favorite part of Commune?

Working with Jenny! (aw shucks) Besides that, the community of dynamic, creative people and the message behind the madness.

7. Why do you think it’s important to take a stand against Big Tobacco?

Big industries (big tobacco, big oil, big pharma, big banks, big corporations) are bloated, soulless, life-destroying, planet-trashing machines that don’t give a shit about you, me, anyone or anything but their own swollen wallets. They must be destroyed.

8. Anything else you want people to know?

Vote YES on Props 30 and 37 and NO on 32 and 38. But don’t take my word for it. The info is out there.

Congrats again to one of our favorite Commune photographers, Nicole Espina.

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com.

 

FEATURED LOCAL: Found Pieces

 

Congratulations to Jess Lambard, creator of FOUND pieces for being voted by YOU as Commune’s Featured Local in August. I messaged Jess to congratulate her on winning and to see what she had going on.

1. When did you start FOUND and where do you draw inspiration?

Found Pieces officially started as a Jewelry line in the Summer of 2009.  For me, inspiration is everywhere.  When I first began making jewelry, Inspiration was found throughout my travels.  While traveling in Central America I was fortunate enough to be surrounded by an undeniably beautiful landscape, materials, and a haven of creativity.

2. How did you come up with the name?

No pun intended, but the name really did find me, or I was “found” by it. Growing up in the Phoenix area was amazing, but definitely lacked a certain sense of individuality or  the kind of culture that I had come to find so inspiring and necessary for me to create throughout my travels. My style and creations are eclectic yes, but that is a reflection of me, my roots, and my history. I absolutely have the southwest Native AMERICAN influence, but Arizona’s proximity to both California and Mexico is evident as well. Through out the evolution of FOUND, one thing has been consistent which is me finding things, DISCOVERING things; actual materials to incorporate into my pieces, friends or family giving me old materials to reinvent, and from the amazing community that is San Diego around me. This wild adventure found me!

3. Where can people find your stuff? Any upcoming shows or cool things you are working on?

As of right now my stuff is available online, in select stores, and at local farmer’s markets. Because inspiration and creativity is such an organic process for me, what is available for purchase is limited at any given moment and depends on where you’re looking. I sell my pieces at different farmer’s markets around San Diego- the Hillcrest  Farmers Market on Sundays and the Ocean Beach Farmers Market on Wednesdays. Also,  Hunt & Gather in North Park consistently has my pieces. You can also go to foundpieces.com, or etsy.com/foundpieces to shop online for my staple designs. But currently I am putting the finishing touches on my winter 2012 line, (last minute of course) which will be all new designs. Honestly though, you just have to find me if you want the rad stuff. Your persistence and loyalty will pay off. I am not an eletist by any means, but there is definitely something to be said about exclusivity. I don’t make a dozen of one thing. When  get Inspired, I make an original piece.

4. What is your favorite thing about Commune?

Well I moved to San Diego for a reason, which is because I love it! I love the culture, the history, and inspiration I draw from living here. So anything that supports local business and artists, I support completely. I love any establishment or idea that sticks it to the man, which is what exactly what Big Tabacco is. Commune not only supports local culture, but wants to stick it to the man as well! What’s not to like?

5. Why do you think it’s important to take a stand against Big Tobacco?

It’s important because Big Tobacco is literally killing the culture that Commune supports, and the artists that make up that culture. There is this preconceived notion (perpetuated by Big Tobacco) that our community is made up of the cool kids and that all the cool kids smoke, which is not the case at all. It’s important that the people who look up to us, look up to our talent and not the unhealthy habits that only a fraction of us have.

6. Anything else you want people to know about FOUND?

This is my baby and every piece really was born from greatness. Each piece has such a great story that makes it unique. When someone purchases and then wears one of pieces. They truly are wearing a piece of me and my crazy imagination.

CONGRATS again to Jess for winning Commune featured local!

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com

FEATURED LOCAL: Industry Bastards

 

Congratulations to Industry Bastards for being voted by YOU as Commune’s Featured Local in June. I messaged the handsome duo (Javi and Jason) to congratulate them on winning and to see what they had going on.

1. When did you start Industry Bastards and where do you draw inspiration?

Industry Bastards spawned from a previous clothing line that started in 2008, and became its own entity with new partners in 2012. Inspiration and overall creative direction is pulled from our passions, and whatever may be prevalent and/or important to us. Javi pulls a lot of influence from music, most notably, Black metal and Punk Rock, as well as from his cats, Rocket and Dennis. They are good cats. JFeather pulls influence from his art background, and Bobby pulls influence from his overall life experiences, or whatever happens to pop in his head at any given moment. Although we are different stylistically, we are bonded together by the one common denominator that is a big factor in all our lives, which is our love for alcohol and all the elements which help create the nightlife industry.

2. How did you come up with the name?

Two of our partners, David and Bobby are both bartenders, and although they exist within the nightlife industry, they are not all about glitz and glam, look at me aspect of it. They are the bastards of the industry. That is why we place a strong emphasis on tipping your bartenders, since they are the foundation, and are often overlooked.

We figured, “f*ck it, we like to drink, so why not place focus on an industry we enjoy existing in.” That is how the name and barkey logo came to be.

3. Where can people find your stuff? Any upcoming shows or cool things you are working on?

All our designs can be found through our retail website, www.galleryaka.com  and can be seen on www.industrybastards.com . The next show we are doing is with our good friend Mike Cooper on August 11th. It’s a pop up boutique called the Sugar Room, which involves local vendors and artists. It is always a blast, and should be filled with super fun times and awesomeness.

4. What is your favorite thing about Commune?

Jenny Kondrasky’s smile.  sup.  *looks over at Jenny*
[Haha thanks ya babes. *blushes*]

5. Why do you think it’s important to take a stand against Big Tobacco?

We feel it is important to take a stand against anything you do not believe in, espcially a product that has had a negative affect on your life or loved ones. We take a firm stand against the films of Zac Efron, since they have a negative affect humanity.

6. Anything else you want people to know about Industry Bastards?

The entire script of Gummo is comprised of a series of non sequiturs. Nicholas Cage loses his sh*t in every movie. Red Vines + Dr. Pepper = crazy delicious. Ian Curtis, we hardly knew you. Chris Lucas may be the best dude we have ever met ever. Ace of Base: The Sign, deserved more recognition for its genius. Stop pretending you would do otherwise, because when zombies do eventually happen, you would probably run in circles with your pinkies in the air. You can learn everything you need to know about love by watching High Fidelity. Oh, and FREE Lil Boosie!

CONGRATS again to the mega babes behind Industry Bastards for winning Commune featured local!

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com

FEATURED LOCAL: Luis The Beast

 

Congratulations to Luis The Beast (Luis Gomez) for being voted by YOU as Commune’s Featured Local in May. I messaged Luis to congratulate him on winning and to see what he had going on.

1. How long have you been DJing and what motivated you to start?

I have always had an interest with anything involving music. Whether it be playing guitar, playing drums, or just plain listening to music. I recently just started DJing. This WEIRDO, MONK THE PUNK, introduced me to this whole new world. He had his whole set up, turntables, mixer and computer, and says, “GO FOR IT.” From there, I grew a strong passion for it. I have always had a Respect for DJing and DJs, and being able to join that crowd is pretty rad. Before I started DJing, it seemed as though something was missing in my life. I couldn’t really complain, I had your average 9-5, a beautiful wife, had great friends, but there was just something missing. Since being introduced, it seems like it’s all I think about, and all I want to do. Along with playing real instruments, DJing is a form of expression. I love being the reason to have a good time.

2. What music inspires you?

I’m sure everyone dreads this question. And I’m sure I’m not the only one who has answered “EVERYTHING!” Honestly, I love anything that can make your head bob, or get you moving. I like to pull from hip-hop, r&b, oldies, 80’s, 90’s and classic rock the most. Growing up my mom would try and push all her favorites from when she was growing up, mostly pulling from greats like Led Zeppelin, The Beatles, Frank Sinatra, things of that sort. I guess I can thank my dad for introducing me to Rap/Hip-hop and R & B at young age. He actually bought me the “CHRONIC” album from Dr. Dre!

3. Where can people find you DJing?

Currently, I’ve been working private events, but I am eager to tap into the San Diego Industry. Any chance I get, I like to take. Bring the party and making people dance and forget about life and have a good time is what I’m all about. I also have some mixtapes in the works, and you can check them out on my soundcloud http://soundcloud.com/luis-the-beast.

4. What is your favorite thing about Commune?

It’s a great platform for individuals to meet and express their own passions, whether it be musically, through art, through fashion, or socially.

5. Why do you think it’s important to stand up against tobacco corporations?

I feel that most of this world is run by marketing. It’s important to stand up to tobacco corporations because they target our youth in their marketing campaigns. As a smoker myself, I started at a young age. If we can stop the influence in our younger generations, it would prolong their futures.

6. Is there anything else you want people to know about?

Feel free to reach me via email ltbgomez@yahoo.com with any type of feedback. I owe a lot of gratitude to my homeboy Mikey and The Dead View Project, my dude Monk the Punk, and of course, my loving wife Tawnee, without whom, I probably wouldn’t be where I am at today.

Also a HUGE Thank You to all of those who voted. I can’t wait to make people dance! Let’s Get Weird!

Congrats again to Luis for winning Commune featured local!

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com

 

FEATURED LOCAL: Brendan B & The Breaks

 

Congratulations to Brendan B & The Breaks for being voted by YOU as Commune’s Featured Local in April. I messaged Brendan to congratulate him on winning and to see what he had going on.

1. How long have you guys been playing together and how did you come up with the name Brendan B and The Breaks?

Back in ‘99 I moved from Chicago to my uncle’s house in Ventura. We turned my cousin’s music room into my bedroom. Every morning my cousins would wake me up by pounding on drums and thrashing the guitar. I’d instantly start freestyling. The name, BrendanB & the Breaks came from my name, which is Brendan Bohan and the band, which plays break beats.

2. How would you describe your music?

We are a live Hip Hop band. The Roots meets the Black Keys, meets ‘Ol Dirty Bastard. Keep it sick with it- watch ‘em flip the script- how many rappers you know rock with instruments?

3. What’s one interesting fact about each person in the band?

Ryan Bohan has not once told a lie in his life. Patrick Bohan has never stepped foot in Bluefoot Bar and Lounge. Brian Rath dabbles with bath salt and hasn’t slept in 82 days. My (Brendan’s) mom has a tattoo that simply says “son.”

4. Do you guys have anything exciting coming up that people should keep their eye out for?

We have four shows in the month of July, which are all in different towns in San Diego. We are also currently recording an EP with Keith sweaty of Jamuel Saxon.

5.What’s your favorite thing about Commune?

Commune is very informative in a non aggressive way. They always put on great shows that are fun and hip and their staff kicks ass.

6. Why do you think it’s important to take a stand against Big Tobacco?

I’ve never smoked myself, and am not here to tell you what to do, but take a stand against big tobacco- less people will smell like shit. Ha!

7. Anything else you want people to know about Brendan B and The Breaks?

Our next show is @ Calvin Harrison Fords and DJ Miike Snowmobile’s house July 4th.

For more on Brendan B & The Breaks check out http://www.myspace.com/brendanbreaks

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com

FEATURED LOCAL: Lucy Duarte

 

Congratulations to Lucy Duarte for being voted by YOU as Commune’s Featured Local in March. I messaged Lucy to congratulate her on winning and to see what she had going on.

1 )  How would you describe your art?

Perhaps it’s a bit shocking at first. I enjoy creating the type of things you don’t necessarily see every day.I tend to have very vivid and intense dreams and I gather a lot of my inspiration from there. I heard some where, a long time ago that Dali had intense dreams and he could train himself  to wake up in the middle of the night and start painting what he saw, I don’t do that exactly, but I do have a sketch book I keep in my nightstand and as soon as I wake up I’ll take notes or sketch what I saw in my dreams, and I’ll use it for reference later.

2) What inspires you?

My dreams, my loved ones, local talented artist, great films, music, traumatic experiences, wonderful experiences. As well as artists like Egon Schiele, Edward Hopper and Shel Silverstein all play a role in inspiring me.

3) Where can people find your art? Any upcoming shows or cool things you are working on?

People can find my art at lucyduarteart.com, or by adding me on facebook. As of right now people can see some of my work up at the Tin Can ale house, in Bankers Hill. I’m working on new pieces now, but at the moment I’m currently consumed with finishing up my portfolio and graduating with a Bachelors Degree in Graphic Design from the Art Institute of San Diego California.

4) What is your favorite thing about Commune?

What I like about Commune is their plan of attack. They don’t come and lecture you as to why smoking is bad, Commune really makes an effort to make quitting fun and informative. They really do a great job getting involved with the community and integrating good health, good music and good art all in one event.

5) Why do you think it’s important to stand up against tobacco corporations?

Tobacco corporations aren’t legally allowed to market their products to children, so their next age group is young adults, ages 18-25. I guess it hits closer to home when I fall under that age group and I see people that I know and love already facing some of the consequences of smoking at such a young age. Tobacco corporations are not only taking money out of our pockets, but most importantly they are taking our lives, if that’s not reason enough to stand up against tobacco corporations, then I don’t know what is.

CONGRATS again to LUCY DUARTE for winning Commune featured local. For more on Lucy check out the link below:
lucyduarteart.com

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com

FEATURED LOCAL: Josh Edgerton

 

Congratulations to Josh Edgerton for being voted by YOU as Commune’s Featured Local in February. I messaged Josh to congratulate him on winning and to see what he had going on.

1. How would you describe your art?

I would describe my art as a collection of experiences and ideas that are communicated through non-verbal means. I like the deconstruction of elements, getting at the core of an object or idea and re-assembling into my own frame work. I also like to leave a large portion of the creative process and representation up to the viewer.

2. What inspires you?

I am inspired by new materials, limited resources, unexpected happenings and most of all music.

3. Where can people find your art? Any upcoming shows or cool things you are working on?

People can find out about works of art that I am currently working on and past projects through be.net/mindmutant. Soon I will have pictures up of pieces that are available for purchase and current projects that I am working on. One cool thing that I am working on is for a friends guest registry at their wedding another is finishing up a mural at my house.

4. What is your favorite thing about Commune?

I like commune because it allows a collection of individuals to focus on one idea and represent it in several different ways. And you get a free poster!

5. Why do you think it’s important to stand up against tobacco corporations?

I think it is important to stand up against tobacco corporations because no one else will stand up for you. Most of the dangers and harmful effects of tobacco goes on behind the scenes and goes beyond just the obvious that tobacco causes cancer. Having an event like commune can educate people on why to not smoke cigarettes.

The change of anything in the world starts with you, if you want to change anything in the world all you have to do is change yourself and the world may follow. You are the light into your own life.

CONGRATS again to JOSH EDGERTON for winning Commune featured local. For more on Josh check out the link below:
be.net/mindmutant

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com

FEATURED LOCAL: Marcus Price

 

Congratulations to Marcus Price for being voted by YOU as Commune’s Featured Local in January. I messaged Marcus to congratulate him on winning and to see what he had going on.

1. How would you describe your art?

Schizophrenic…maybe. I’m a project artist, so almost everything I put my hands on is something I’ve never done before. New techniques. New objectives. I want to learn something new every time I create, so I’m constantly putting myself in unfamiliar waters.

2. What inspires you?

I made a commitment to myself about 3 years ago. I said that if I was going to take myself seriously as an artist, I also would need to take seriously the things that inspire me. As a result I’m on a never ending quest for inspiration, and making time for it has been one of the greatest investments I’ve ever made for myself. This means traveling to new places, spending time with other artists/creatives, studying old recordings, pulling apart radios, fighting with my sewing machine, riding the train, watching and re-watching films. I’ve been watching a lot of old horror movies lately. The hills have eyes, Cronos, The Serpent and the Rainbow, Children of the Corn. It’s rather obvious when you look at the poster/t-shirt I designed for Commune. The particular quote that I used for the design, ‘At some point they begin to crawl”, seemed as though it came to us from a strange, alternate, monstrous existence. It gave me the chills.

3. Where can people find your art? Any upcoming shows or cool things you are working on?

Haha, there’s so much! This next quarter is going to be a busy one. I’m working on a show that’s coming up at the re-gallery in north county. I’ll be teaming up with local San Diego artist, Wes Bruce. We last worked together on an installation show in NYC in 2009 benefiting. I’m not sure how much I can say about it at this point. It’ll be open at the end of March. It’s called ‘The Salton Sea Studies: a Visual Representation of an Indepth Exploration’. I’m also working on a musical project called ‘The Darque’ with my good friend Jahmal Tonge, previously of Thunderheist and The Carps. We met when I was living in NYC playing in a band called “Hussle Club”.  I think this may actually be the first public announcement for The Darque…

Outside of that , my most recent endeavor has been designing a line of travel bags. The project is called Toil + Trouble, and it was originally born out of my obsession with pockets and bags. My goal with every piece is to create high quality canvas and leather goods that evoke both nostalgia and inventiveness. I’ve spent a good amount of time skateboarding around the LA fashion district looking for the best materials and components. It’s been a great experience.

My freelance work can be found under the name All City Design.

featured local marcus price 1

 

4. What is your favorite thing about Commune? 

Commune is very tangible and accessible. It’s a great platform in the community for artists and musicians to interact and to share. It’s really quite brilliant.

5. Why do you think it’s important to stand up against tobacco corporations?

Tobacco companies are solely focused on and purely driven by their own profits. It’s truly an amazing feat that they have been able to exist for so long. It seems like buildings full of greedy old white dudes have a knack for surviving, while the rest of us deteriorate and fight over scraps. It makes my head spin. I’m so impressed by and thankful for groups like Commune who use their time and resources to get people to stop and ask the question, ‘What the hell is going on here?” Keep it up.

CONGRATS again to MARCUS PRICE for winning Commune featured local. For more on Marcus check out the links below:
www.allcitydesign.com
www.facebook.com/price.marcus
www.twitter.com/marcusprice

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com

FEATURED LOCAL: HAMMERED

 

Congratulations to Corine Grant,  creator of Hammered pieces for being voted by YOU as Commune’s Featured Local in December. I messaged Corine to congratulate her on winning and to see what rad stuff she had going on.

1.    When did you start Hammered and where do you draw inspiration?

Ever since elementary school I would write notes to myself on the back of my hand. Sometimes it was a line from a book I was reading, a verse from a song, the title of a poem, or something someone said to me. They were always things that motivated and inspired me, made me change my perspective, or just feel happier about life. I planned to get my favorite one tattooed, but I couldn’t pick one because I liked so many.

In 2007, I wanted to create something that I could wear all the time that was simple and didn’t distract from the message. I decided to have someone engrave a word for me on a silver disc and I asked them to punch a hole on both ends. I put a string through the holes and tied a knot to keep it on.

Eventually, I took an hour long class at the Spanish Village to learn how to stamp. I first starting doing this for myself – but soon realized that everyone can relate to needing a bit of encouragement. One thing led to another and before I knew it, I was selling these bracelets to stores all over San Diego and shipping online orders as far away as Norway, Hong Kong, and Australia. Then stores across the country started placing orders and things took off.

I’m inspired by my parents, my family and friends. People who were told that they couldn’t do something, but managed to do it anyway through hard work and a strong desire to succeed. A good example is my great-uncle Edward who started as a black caddy at a white only country club. He went on to open Grant’s Lounge, one of the first non-segregated clubs in Georgia. A place where anyone could go and watch Tom Petty, Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Allman Brothers, and Eric Clapton play. Whenever I feel like I can’t do something, I look at my family and friends and see what they were able to accomplish and this motivates me.

2. How did you come up with the name?

I use a hammer to stamp every single letter onto my pieces. It’s the most important tool that I use and the name Hammered just sounded better than Stamped.

3. Where can people find your stuff? Any upcoming shows or cool things you are working on?

My line is available at Fred Segal in Santa Monica, Capricorn in La Jolla, Pigment in North Park, Cathedral in Hillcrest and Vocabulary in Little Italy. The new web site will be up soon: www.ShopHammered.com In the meantime, you can browse through photos on our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/ShopHammered

4. What is your favorite thing about Commune?

I love the atmosphere and I always look forward to the new talent featured every month. It’s truly wonderful to have someone believe in you and give you an outlet to display your artwork, designs and music.

5. Why do you think it’s important to take a stand against Big Tobacco?

With media being so accessible to everyone- especially children and teens- its important to have an open dialogue with Big Tobacco to prevent them from using the media to easily  persuade or influence youngsters. By taking a stand we can regulate their abuse of the media through their advertising campaigns.

6. Anything else you want people to know about Hammered?

Yeah, get Hammered- everyone else is.

CONGRATS again to CORINE & HAMMERED for winning Commune featured local. For more on HAMMERED check out the link below:
www.ShopHammered.com

If you would like to be part of Commune and stand up for a smokefree scene, contact us at info@jointhecommune.com

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